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July 12, 2010 / theoldsilly

Monday Meandering Muse – Part One

So it’s Monday again, and the Old Silly will be back out in the fields during the traditional workweek, laboring alongside my son, Blue Moonsky Wilson, in our new organic compost enterprise. It’s been a couple months now, since we started, and I’ve made a few observations about physical labor and how it relates to being a writer. Since I have less time to write and blog these days, I will be doing a weekly feature on Mondays here on Free Spirit in which I will share, one at a time, some muses I’ve had. The first installment is now, and to wit:

  • Tired is more a state of mind than a physical thing. Before this summer, me being a stay-at-home desk-bound writer, I could get tired just carrying out the trash and doing some house chores. “Chore” is the key word here – a negative connotation. Now I can work 6,7,8 or 10 hours a day, and while the 60-year-old body does yell at me a lot, because I have a passion for what I am doing I am not “tired” while doing it. Do I feel it at the end of the day? Yuuup, and for real. But I’m feeling blessed for having regained the stamina to work this hard and not feel mentally like it is a “chore”.

How does this relate to writing? Do you (you writers) ever get “tired head”? Feel like the writing has become a “chore”? If so, examine the passion you have for what you are doing. Is it there? Are you in love with what you are doing/writing? If not, stop! Do something else for a while. Change up the routine. Live a little, do something completely different for “you” – outside of your typical M.O. Try skydiving or snorkling or eating chocolate or panhandling while dressed in rags. Lord knows, I would have told anyone a year ago that forecasted me working on a farm barefooted and shirtless under the blazing sun all the livelong day, I’d have declared them mad.

But it has had great impact on my writing. I now treasure writing time more when I have it, am more focused and productive when writing and editing, and have more energy for work and writing. Will this phase of my life and career last forever? Of course not, this too, like all things shall pass. My muse and point is, let not your life and writing get stagnant. Shake things up when you reach an impasse, and fear not change … embrace it, even seek it out, then learn and grow from it.

That’s it for this Monday Morning Muse. I will find time during the week to post some more, and to visit you bloggers, too. Have a wonderful and blessed day, y’all, this from the heart of the Old Silly. Chow …

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21 Comments

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  1. Marcus Franks / Jul 12 2010 8:28 am

    Good point, Marv, and I think this relates to ALL careers and life endeavors, not just writing. Ya gotta love what you do, or you’ll be doing “chores” all your life!

  2. Kissie / Jul 12 2010 9:06 am

    Yes, I so enjoy writing but didn’t like having to do it.

    Because I have been trying to get the “order” back in my life, I decided to post once a week for consistency and freshness. This choice allows me the freedom to explore other passions within.

    In Exile

    • theoldsilly / Jul 12 2010 1:11 pm

      That’s a good idea, especially if that rhythmn works for you, Kissie. But “in exile”? Huh? From who/what? πŸ˜‰

  3. Terri Dryden / Jul 12 2010 9:16 am

    Very true Marvin…I wish I could do “manual” labor again! I’ve gone back to trying to knit and crochet! Not helping the shoulder tho!!!

  4. Alex J. Cavanaugh / Jul 12 2010 10:12 am

    Wise advice, Marvin.
    I view going outside as a chore because it implies me mowing the grass or trimming hedges.

    • theoldsilly / Jul 12 2010 1:11 pm

      Alex, lol – know the feeling, teehee. πŸ™‚

  5. Ron Berry / Jul 12 2010 10:35 am

    Losing the net and word for two weeks does inspire the writing bug. It’s ironic that I lost both, but it happened. I need office both for my writing and one of my other endeavors, Toastmasters. I’ve been doing many powerpoint speeches (Einstein’s famous equation, black holes and coming up, punctuation). Speaking of punctuation, I am reading a fascinating book called “Eats, Shoots, and Leaves” by Lynn Voss. I also make beaded jewelry and need to redo one that is being sent to Malta.

    Thanks for allowing me a chance to blow my own horn here. Good blog.

  6. Arlee Bird / Jul 12 2010 10:55 am

    Oh so true. Being apart from what you love either makes you appreciate it more or realize you don’t love it as much as you think you did– goes for people or things. We all need a break now and then. Having a diversity of interests and activities is important in keeping your work fresh and inspried.

    Lee
    Tossing It Out

  7. Mason Canyon / Jul 12 2010 12:44 pm

    Very wise views. We can either look at life as a chore or something we enjoy. Best of luck on the manual labor.

    Mason
    Thoughts in Progress

  8. Cactus Annie / Jul 12 2010 1:07 pm

    Wonderful muse and sage advice, Old Silly! And Good luck with your business with your son, too!

    • theoldsilly / Jul 12 2010 1:12 pm

      Thank you Cactus – you’re a sweetie! πŸ™‚

  9. Stanley Berber / Jul 12 2010 1:14 pm

    Wise advice and good muse, Marv – and I’m with Marcus – it applies to ANY line of work or life endeavor … keep it fresh and alive and be in love with it, or DO SOMETHING ELSE!

  10. ReformingGeek / Jul 12 2010 1:30 pm

    Yes, very wise words. I find that getting out of the routine helps with just about any issue. Our brains and our bodies need a change of pace. If we feel we are in a negative spiral, take a moment to do something nice for someone. It may make one heck of a difference in your state of mind.

  11. AmyLK / Jul 12 2010 2:48 pm

    Enjoy you time on the farm!

  12. Jane Kennedy Sutton / Jul 12 2010 3:30 pm

    Do I ever suffer from β€œtired head!” You mean that’s not a normal condition? I think you’re right – I need to change up my routine. I’m not sure physical exertion is my thing, but I’ll try to think of something. Glad you’re reaping benefits from your new enterprise.

  13. Simon Hay / Jul 12 2010 7:51 pm

    Working outside is so satisfying. Movement is the best tonic for creativity. Change is good for relationships too. Writing is an intense relationship with passion. I’ll roll in the dirt with you for a weekend or two.

  14. Will Burke / Jul 12 2010 9:28 pm

    I’ve found physical work to be wonderful for spurring ideas. I’ve gotten more plot ideas while raking the yard than any other time!

  15. tashabud / Jul 13 2010 6:01 am

    I’ve got to stop turning on my computer. I get enslaved the minute that I log on. Just tonight, I read your blog about the autistic artist. Then I got on to utube. I clicked to all the other videos and got me clicking the night away. By the time I knew, 4 hours had past. Whew!

    Good luck with your business venture.

  16. Karen Walker / Jul 13 2010 9:24 am

    I like this meandering muse, Marv. Seeing work as a chore sets us up to feel somewhat negative. I love that you are doing something you are passionate about with your son. And something good for the environment as well. I’ve been toying with whether to find work outside the writing arena part-time. This is inspiring.
    Karen

  17. Leeuna / Jul 13 2010 7:51 pm

    Amen to that, Marvin. I’ve begun to not enjoy my writing as much as I once did. I think I’ll take your advice and mix things up a little. Actually, physical exercise is great for the muse. I think it’s because the chemicals that our brains release make us more creative. Happy composting. πŸ™‚

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